BREATHE EASY: HEALTHIER INDOOR AIR IN COLD WEATHER:

As the seasons change and the colder temperatures prevent you from letting outside air into your home, oftentimes the quality of the air is greatly effected.

According to Healthy Living Guide, ‘Weatherproofing your house doesn’t solve the problem. It just means the pollutants have nowhere to go. In fact, the air indoors can be two to five times more toxic than the air outdoors. Worse, most people spend much of their time indoors in winter.’

Poor indoor air quality stems from a variety of issues: chemical off-gassing from furniture and appliances, odors, pet dander, mold, smoke and the chemicals in household products.

During the winter, respiratory issues also tend to increase and children that suffer from allergies, especially, have a harder time breathing inside the home space.

The good news: Small but significant changes can improve the quality of the air in your home.

1) ENTRYWAY DUST:

Dust is a pollutant.  It can be especially harmful to children because they spend more time on or near the floor.

‘House dust is a mixture of dirt, dust mites, dander, pollen and other particles. Chances are lead dust has gathered, too, especially in homes built before the 1970s. To make matters worse, dust may also contain chemicals emitted by furniture, electronics, plastics and fabric’

By placing doormats in your entry ways that are regularly cleaned, you can help mitigate the dust that is spread.  You can also institute a no-shoes policy to cut down on the pollutants tracked into your home.

Healthy Living Guide also recommends using ‘a vacuum machine with a high-efficiency particulate air filter, making sure to clean the filter regularly. Follow with a damp mop and plain water to pick up any excess. You can also dust with a damp cotton or microfiber cloth.

2)  CARPETS:

Wall-to-wall carpets are nearly impossible to keep clean, trapping dust and other pollutants like dander and mold.  Experts recommend vacuuming at least three times a week to remove as much dust as possible.

But even if you can remove all the dust, carpets can also contain an array of harmful chemicals – in the fiber, backing, padding and glue, and in flame-retardant and stain-resistant, waterproofing treatments.

Your best bet is to remove the carpet altogether and replace it with wood or tile flooring.

3)  FURNITURE:

When purchasing furniture, the last thing that comes to mind is how the pieces in your home can be affecting the air that you’re breathing.

Like carpet, upholstery is often treated with chemicals that are similarly harmful to people and the environment. Foam cushions can also be a problem because they’re made with petroleum chemicals that can emit VOCs.

According to Healthy Living Guide, ‘natural latex foam cushions are the best alternative. As with your carpets, make sure to vacuum regularly to control dust.’

And with furniture, it’s not just the upholstery that can be a source of contaminants.  Plywood, particle board and composite wood frames can also emit toxic chemicals.

When selecting furniture, attempt to purchase sold wood options.

4)  ATMOSAIR INDOOR AIR QUALITY SYSTEM:

Equipping your home’s air handler or HVAC system with an AtmosAir Bipolar Ionization unit can help reduce certain biological organisms such as spores, bacteria and even the tiniest viruses.

AtmosAir Bi Polar Ionization systems, as demonstrated in our numerous projects, provide a unique hybrid of air purification: particle filtration, VOC filtration, and airborne virus filtration.